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800 drivers, conductors attend road safety education class
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Panchkhal vegetables not harmful: DAO
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Dahal threatens to quit CA

REPUBLICA
Says parties should agree on identity-based federalism

KATHMANDU, Aug 23 :UCPN (Maoist) Chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal has warned of walking out of the Constituent Assembly (CA) and launching street protests if the parties do not reach an agreement on guaranteeing identity-based federalism in the new constitution by mid-September.

Arguing that UCPN (Maoist) along with other parties batting for identity-based federalism had joined the CA on condition of owning agreements reached in the previous CA, Dahal accused the ruling Nepali Congress and CPN-UML of backtracking from past agreements. [More]

  Nepali stage Yesterday today and tomorrow  
  BY ASHISH DHAKAL  
 
In his 2008 book ‘Theatre for Transformation’, Ghimire Yubaraj, a famous theatre artist for 15 years now, states that every theatre in the world has its root in culture. “Every ancient theatre started as a form of honoring the Gods,” he says.

According to him, theatre in Nepal is believed to have started around 2400 years ago in a similar manner to worship the Gods, and the earliest recorded performance was the Harisiddhi dance. “Earlier on, dances were theatre performances,” he adds. “In Nepal, even during the 1980’s, musicals with songs and dances inspired by Hindi films were staged as theatre performances.”

 
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  • Menstruation: Is it really a sin?
    MANISHA NEUPANE
    KATHMANDU, Aug 22: Our country, Nepal, is surely rich in culture, tradition and customs. Many people around the world can’t get enough of our vivacious rituals and values. But some of aspects of the same customs and traditions need to be revised. Take for example the misconceptions related to women’s menstruation cycle. Women are practically treated as ‘untouchables’ during those days. They’re kept away from sources of water and male members of their family, and they’re even told that various food items can rot if they touch them while menstruating. They aren’t even allowed to offer their prayers in temples…they need to stay away from Gods. If any woman does what she has been prohibited to do while menstruating, she’s labeled a sinner.

    Every year, the Brahmin and Chettri community of the country celebrate Rishi Panchami, (it falls a day after Hindu women’s biggest festival Teej) to wash off the ‘sins’ they have committed throughout the year by menstruating. On the particular day, they gather around nearby lakes or ponds and scrub their bodies with special soils and shrubs that are believed to ‘purify’ their otherwise ‘polluted’ bodies. In the end, after purifying themselves, they offer puja to the Sapta Rishis.    [More]
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